Final Processing Project
As per usual, I bit off more than I could chew initially. I wanted to create a drawing program, so I went about looking for codes online that I could modify. I found a few, but they were quite above my head, using things like “class” and other functions I didn’t recognize. After struggling to understand them, I gave up and went with something more simple. 
I used the code we learned in class after failing with the actual “constrain” function, and I came up with the fading with an if/else statement. When the mouse is clicked, the circles appear. It’s super simple but it makes for a pretty fun little drawing program.

Final Processing Project

As per usual, I bit off more than I could chew initially. I wanted to create a drawing program, so I went about looking for codes online that I could modify. I found a few, but they were quite above my head, using things like “class” and other functions I didn’t recognize. After struggling to understand them, I gave up and went with something more simple. 

I used the code we learned in class after failing with the actual “constrain” function, and I came up with the fading with an if/else statement. When the mouse is clicked, the circles appear. It’s super simple but it makes for a pretty fun little drawing program.

Second ever processing work!
Not too difficult, but it does look a little off from the original. I put the image in photoshop to try and get the right colors.I worked with some classmates to do this, and a lot of our codes are similar but they still look a little different from each other. 

Second ever processing work!

Not too difficult, but it does look a little off from the original. I put the image in photoshop to try and get the right colors.I worked with some classmates to do this, and a lot of our codes are similar but they still look a little different from each other. 

First processing sketch! I actually found it pretty simple, and I’m excited to try things that are a little more complex. I found a lot of it was trail and error, and moving things around one pixel at a time. I won’t be surprised if it turns out to be pretty difficult though, going by my luck so far in this class.

First processing sketch! I actually found it pretty simple, and I’m excited to try things that are a little more complex. I found a lot of it was trail and error, and moving things around one pixel at a time. I won’t be surprised if it turns out to be pretty difficult though, going by my luck so far in this class.

The Arduino Project.

Pretty sure I’m far from the only one that had trouble with this project. I started out with what I thought was a simple concept, a cube that lit up to tell the user they had an email. Building the cube was the easy part, it only took me a couple hours one evening to fabricate one from things I bought at Michael’s.I found the code online had it all started, but unfortunately my laptop’s logic board got fried.

So, being computerless, I had no choice but to used the computers at the school. I ran into a lot of trouble trying to get Gmail to communicate with the arduino, so I scraped the idea from something simpler.

My next idea was to create a cube the changed colour based on how much light there was. The more light, the more red it would glow and the less light, the more blue it would glow. This was pretty easy to do, I used two photocells attached to two LEDs and found some code online and got it working pretty quick.

I then wanted to add a servo that would moved based on the light as well, so it would switch from left to right based on the time of the day. I tried using the photocells already on my board, then tried with a separate photocell. It just wasn’t working, and in the process I melted a 9V battery (which I didn’t know was possible) and shorted out my servo. 

I decided to make it super simple and just have potentiometer control the servo (which I had to borrow from someone). This also fulfilled the the human interaction part of the project. 

I am a little disappointed I couldn’t get what I had originally planned working. This project ended up being a lot more difficult than I anticipated, but it made me more curious as to what I could do with the arduino. It definitely did not ruin it for me, and I plan on using it again in the future. 

I’ll post a picture of it lighting up soon. 

Arduino Tutorials 5, 6, 7, and 9.

Alright, it took a lot of trouble, but I did tutorials 5,6,7 and 9. The first four are on my laptop, which, unfortunately, died on me today. It’s being replaced but it could take some time. I’ll probably just redo the tutorials, more practice couldn’t hurt.

Couldn’t get #5 to work. My potentiometer and servo were slightly different than the ones used in the book. I thought I set it up in a way the that would work with this, but the thing still never turned. I ended up having trouble with the ports as well. I’m pretty sure my coding and circuit where okay, so I’m going to blame the computer for this one.

#6 didn’t work until I switched ports, but worked great afterwards. That thing is pretty obnoxious sounding. 

#7 was pretty quick and easy.

#9 I had a little trouble with the battery. It was an old one, so it might have been dying on me. But other than that, it worked. I didn’t have a CD handy, so I just let the motor twirl without it. 

I think these tutorials are useful, but a little dry. I also found it hard to follow along at some points because it doesn’t really hold your hand. But I feel like like I’m way more comfortable with the Arduino now.

This is my pop up book inspired by Alice in Wonderland! It’s not as complex as I’d have like to have made it, because I had a lot of difficulty figuring out basic pop up things. I focused a lot on the art part of it and less on the technical, which may have been a mistake as this project was more about the interactivity. I know now for next time that more effort should be applied to the technicalities and I shouldn’t focus so much on making it pretty.

Response to Interaction Design Sketchbook by Bill Verplank:

A lot of people are trying to define “interactivity” in a lot of different ways. I enjoyed Bill Verplank’s use of drawings to help explain his point, even if the drawings themselves were hard to understand. 

Another thing I didn’t quite get was when he said that paths are good for beginners, maps are good for finding alternate routes and take longer, and that paths were good for experts.

Paths are good for both beginners and experts? I can sort of see what he’s trying to say, but that’s pretty confusing. 

This is a tiny .gif of my extended project. It took a lot of work to even get it this small so it could go on tumblr. 
I wanted to create what looked like a chalk or charcoal animation using photoshop. I edited the brush and eraser settings to make them as realistic as possible. Then I drew each frame individually on a stop motion of a globe spinning. In class it was brought up that it’d look more complete with colour, so I added a little bit at the end. 
I’m pretty satisfied with it, even though you can’t really see most of it here due to size restrictions. Hopefully I can get the video to export properly.

This is a tiny .gif of my extended project. It took a lot of work to even get it this small so it could go on tumblr. 

I wanted to create what looked like a chalk or charcoal animation using photoshop. I edited the brush and eraser settings to make them as realistic as possible. Then I drew each frame individually on a stop motion of a globe spinning. In class it was brought up that it’d look more complete with colour, so I added a little bit at the end. 

I’m pretty satisfied with it, even though you can’t really see most of it here due to size restrictions. Hopefully I can get the video to export properly.

Matt Forsythe is an illustrator based out of Montreal, and the lead designer on the cartoon Adventure Time, which I’m a pretty big fan of. He has a few different styles he likes to cycle through. Most of the time he uses saturated/muted colours and a washy/water-colour painting style with thick dark lines. The way he draws his figures varies a lot, so I decided to stick with the style that he draws for the show, because the drawings are simpler and you can really see the design of the characters. 
    His lines are usually left pretty rough throughout all his work, so instead of making a vector drawing (which would be my first instinct with anything Adventure Time), I left my lines rough after scanning them in. He rarely draws backgrounds for his more cartoony-work, but I decided to include on just to complete the composition. I basically just made a character that looks like something he would add to the show. The figure is super simple (which is probably easier to animate), and was originally painted with bright colours. I took the image into Lightroom after painting it in Photoshop to mute the colours a little and put a filter on it to look more like a water colour painting than a digital drawing. On Matt’s blog he talks a lot about how he mostly does digital work but really appreciates it when he gets to use traditional mediums.
      I really tried to emulate his loose style of illustrating. I didn’t stress of staying in the lines but rather tried to put some movement into the drawing. I’m not sure if it was successful, because I find the drawing itself is still pretty stiff, but I really like how the colours and painting turned out. If I were to do this again, I’d simplify it even more and have just the character. 

Matt Forsythe is an illustrator based out of Montreal, and the lead designer on the cartoon Adventure Time, which I’m a pretty big fan of. He has a few different styles he likes to cycle through. Most of the time he uses saturated/muted colours and a washy/water-colour painting style with thick dark lines. The way he draws his figures varies a lot, so I decided to stick with the style that he draws for the show, because the drawings are simpler and you can really see the design of the characters.

    His lines are usually left pretty rough throughout all his work, so instead of making a vector drawing (which would be my first instinct with anything Adventure Time), I left my lines rough after scanning them in. He rarely draws backgrounds for his more cartoony-work, but I decided to include on just to complete the composition. I basically just made a character that looks like something he would add to the show. The figure is super simple (which is probably easier to animate), and was originally painted with bright colours. I took the image into Lightroom after painting it in Photoshop to mute the colours a little and put a filter on it to look more like a water colour painting than a digital drawing. On Matt’s blog he talks a lot about how he mostly does digital work but really appreciates it when he gets to use traditional mediums.

      I really tried to emulate his loose style of illustrating. I didn’t stress of staying in the lines but rather tried to put some movement into the drawing. I’m not sure if it was successful, because I find the drawing itself is still pretty stiff, but I really like how the colours and painting turned out. If I were to do this again, I’d simplify it even more and have just the character. 

Drawing with Type Project:

I used mostly glyphs from various fonts that are probably never used in real life, and the only recognizable letter is the V in the background that forms the star shape. The glyphs I chose caught my eye for one reason or another, and I decided to make a crest-like design. When it’s tiled it kind of looks like plaid, which wasn’t intentional but I really like it. 

Here’s my animation, and I’m not terribly excited about it. Everything went wrong while doing this, like the original images being lost. My idea got a little muddled too, so it’s not terribly clear what’s going on either. 

After seeing my classmates’ work, I have a clearer idea of what I’d do next time. I actually would really like to re-do this, so it might be something I’d do for my final.